Learning Construction Grammars Computationally

Blog post by Jonathan Dunn, Ph.D.

Construction Grammar, or CxG, takes a usage-based approach to describing grammar. In practice, this term usage-based means two different things:

First, it means that idiomatic constructions belong in the grammar. For example, the ditransitive construction “John sent Mary a letter” has item-specific cases like “John gave Mary a hand” and “John gave Mary a hard time.” These idiomatic versions of the ditransitive have distinct meanings. While other grammatical paradigms consider these different meanings to be outside the scope of grammar, CxG argues that idiomatic constructions are actually an important part of grammar.

Second, CxG is usage-based because it argues that we learn grammar by observing actual idiomatic usage: language is more nurture than nature. The role of innate . . . → Read More: Learning Construction Grammars Computationally

Checking in on grammar checking

‘Checking in on Grammar Checking’ by Robert Dale is the latest Industry Watch column to be published in the journal Natural Language Engineering.

Reflecting back to 2004, industry expert Robert Dale reminds us of a time when Microsoft Word was the dominant software used for grammar checking. Bringing us up-to-date in 2016, Dale discusses the evolution, capabilities and current marketplace for grammar checking and its diverse range of users: from academics, men on dating websites to the fifty top celebrities on Twitter.

Below is an extract from the article, which is available to read in full here.

An appropriate time to reflect
I am writing this piece on a very special day. It’s National Grammar Day, ‘observed’ (to . . . → Read More: Checking in on grammar checking

Grammar on the go

Bas Aarts, Dan Clayton and Sean Wallis from University College London, talk about a new way of studying grammar – via a smartphone. . . . → Read More: Grammar on the go