Is the Second Language Acquisition discipline disintegrating?

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Post written by Jan H. Hulstijn, based on an article in Language Teaching

The second language acquisition (SLA) field is characterized by a wide variety of issues and theoretical perspectives. Is this a bad thing? Are there signs of disintegration?

In applied linguistics in general, and in particular in the field of SLA, it is not uncommon to distinguish between quantitative and qualitative approaches or between cognitive and socio-cultural approaches. In my view, what is potentially more threatening to the field than a split between quantitative and qualitative subfields is the proportion of nonempirical theories. If an academic discipline is characterized by too many nonempirical ideas and too few empirical ideas, it runs the risk of losing credit in the scientific community at . . . → Read More: Is the Second Language Acquisition discipline disintegrating?

2012 Christopher Brumfit Award winner Jim Ranalli discusses his prize winning work

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Post written by Jim Ranalli

It’s a great honor to receive the 2012 Christopher Brumfit Award, especially as it commemorates a scholar whose books on communicative methodology were a tremendous source of guidance and inspiration to me when I first trained as an English teacher. I thank the panel of referees, the editor and editorial board of Language Teaching, and Cambridge University Press for this special recognition of my research and the opportunity to share it with a wider audience.

The focus of my thesis was a web-based, instructional resource called VVT (Virtual Vocabulary Trainer), which I developed to teach integrated vocabulary depth of knowledge and dictionary referencing skills to university-level learners of English as a Second Language (ESL). In addition to evaluating . . . → Read More: 2012 Christopher Brumfit Award winner Jim Ranalli discusses his prize winning work

A career in phonetics, applied linguistics and the public service: Talking with John Trim (part 1)

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Post written by David Little and Lid King, based on an article in Language Teaching 

John Trim was born in 1924 and died in January 2013. His father was a docker and his mother the daughter of a printer; both were active in the local Workers’ Educational Association. John described the atmosphere of his home as ‘intellectual, internationalist and socialist’. He won a scholarship from his primary school to Leyton High School, where he learned French and German. For the first term – which John missed because he had pneumonia – his French teacher taught the language entirely in phonetic transcription in order to lay the foundations of accurate pronunciation. In his second year John had to choose between Latin and German. . . . → Read More: A career in phonetics, applied linguistics and the public service: Talking with John Trim (part 1)

Publishing your work in an academic journal – three do’s and a don’t

There are ever-increasing demands on authors/researchers from both local and national authorities not only to publish widely but to do so in “reputable” journals. Indeed, in many countries this is even a requirement before a PhD is awarded. This obligation is often glossed by the need for journals to be indexed in such internationally recognized lists as the ISI.

Editors of journals are only too aware of this “pressure to publish” and it is for this scenario that I offer some personal advice based on my experience of dealing with submissions. Today I want to concentrate on adequate targeting of your work for publication. Specifically, I focus on two aspects which increase your chances of getting published: selecting your topic and target . . . → Read More: Publishing your work in an academic journal – three do’s and a don’t

Christopher Brumfit Award prize winners announced

The 2012 Christopher Brumfit Award winners have been announced! . . . → Read More: Christopher Brumfit Award prize winners announced

2010 Language Teaching Christopher Brumfit Award winner Dr Susy Macqueen discusses her award winning dissertation

When we become highly proficient in a language, we tend to use it in chunks or patterns. For a native language especially, we learn and become adept at manipulating masses of word patterns such as absolutely not, as it were, in light of the fact that, curry favour, I think that, scattered showers, it’s worth –ing, just a sec, etc. Language patterns like these make communication efficient – we don’t need to spend time piecing together the smallest bits of language. Rather, we work with larger bits that are easily accessed in the memories of both the user and the receiver. However, the pervasiveness of patterning makes it quite a challenge to sound ‘natural’ in second languages. Grammatical rules themselves are . . . → Read More: 2010 Language Teaching Christopher Brumfit Award winner Dr Susy Macqueen discusses her award winning dissertation

Applied Linguistics Podcasts & Vodcasts

2014-06-17 09_16_31-Resources _ Cambridge University Press

Recent Podcasts from the September 2010 EuroCALL conference by cutting-edge authors in the field of Applied Linguistics, Robert O’Dowd and Gary Motteram. . . . → Read More: Applied Linguistics Podcasts & Vodcasts

ReCALL: First Special Issue on CMC & Teacher Education

2014-06-17 09_15_31-Edit Post ‹ Cambridge Extra at LINGUIST List — WordPress

CALL and CMC Teacher Education research: enduring questions, emerging methodologies. . . . → Read More: ReCALL: First Special Issue on CMC & Teacher Education