Acquisition of English grammatical morphology by internationally adopted children from China

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Blog post written by Lara Pierce based on an article published in Journal of Child Language

Internationally adopted (IA) children face a unique language learning situation in that they are exposed to one language from birth, but this language is discontinued at the point of adoption in favour of the language spoken by their adoptive family. IA children share similarities in their language environment with monolingual first language (L1) learners in that they receive the majority of their input in only one language. They functionally lose any abilities they had in their birth language quickly (within the first year or less) and typically become monolingual speakers of their adoptive language. However, their language experience also shares similarities with child second . . . → Read More: Acquisition of English grammatical morphology by internationally adopted children from China

A note on the Concept of Gender in French

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by Ronald Batchelor

To the English-speaking beginner, the notion of masculine and feminine gender for French nouns comes as a surprise. Perhaps it should not be so. For in most European languages of Indo-European origin, and this includes Arabic, Pashto, Hindi, among many others, but excludes Basque, Finnish, Hungarian or Turkish, gender distinction forms an integral part of grammatical discourse. But let’s play the devil’s advocate. For such a beginner, the concept of gender assigned to inanimate objects appears extraordinary, lacking all logic and convincing definition. So much for the logic of “Ce qui n’est pas logique n’est pas français.” It seems to make more sense that gender should find no place when applied to inanimate objects, as in English. . . . → Read More: A note on the Concept of Gender in French

Romanian Words of Turkish Origin

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by Julie Tetel Andresen Duke University, North Carolina

My favorite words in Romanian are those of Turkish origin. Because parts of present-day Romania were under Ottoman rule for a long time, it’s natural that Romanian would have lexical borrowings from Turkish. One is the word for tulip. Now, tulips are not native to Holland. They are native to Central Asia, and in the eighteenth century there was a craze for tulips at the Ottoman court, and images of tulips could be found on clothing and furniture, while real tulips flourished in gardens and parks. Still today the tulip is a symbol for Turkey. The English word ‘tulip’ comes from the Turkish word tulbend ‘turban’ because the flower resembles the . . . → Read More: Romanian Words of Turkish Origin

Author Michael Billig asks: Do we ‘Learn to Write Badly’ in the Social Sciences?

Learn to Write Badly

Michael Billig has been Professor of Social Sciences at Loughborough University for more than 25 years. In 2011 he received the Distinguished Contribution to Social Psychology Award from the Social Section of the British Psychological Society.

 

1. What were the greatest challenges you faced in writing Learn to Write Badly?

The most obvious and difficult challenge was to write clearly. Anyone, who criticises the way that other academics write, inevitably sets themselves up as a potential target. So, I had to try to avoid the faults that I was identifying in others. I am criticising a style of writing, which is currently ingrained within the social sciences and which young postgraduates are being taught to use routinely. Therefore, . . . → Read More: Author Michael Billig asks: Do we ‘Learn to Write Badly’ in the Social Sciences?

Special Edition ‘Prescriptivism’ Issue of English Today – extended free access until 1st Dec 2010

A summary introduction to the fantastic special edition issue of English Today on prescriptivism – with links to 4 articles that can be accessed free of charge, for a limited time. . . . → Read More: Special Edition ‘Prescriptivism’ Issue of English Today – extended free access until 1st Dec 2010