The merits of a case study approach in communication disorders

Communication Disorders

Blog post by Louise Cummings, Nottingham Trent University . . . → Read More: The merits of a case study approach in communication disorders

Imagery in Albert Camus’s L’Étranger (1942)

Albert Camus

Cambridge author Dr. Ron Batchelor explores the style of Camus’s L’Étranger . . . → Read More: Imagery in Albert Camus’s L’Étranger (1942)

What are the most popular English language children’s books?

Children's books

Language learning is affected by input, and reading to children is one of these input sources. Which children’s books are most-read to children by parents and caregivers? . . . → Read More: What are the most popular English language children’s books?

Language, cats and extra-terrestrials

Monolith

Cambridge Professor Ian Roberts discusses Language, cats and extra-terrestrials…. . . . → Read More: Language, cats and extra-terrestrials

The brave new world of emoji: Why and how has emoji taken the world by storm?

Dumpling Emoji

Cambridge author Vyvyan Evans explores why and how emojis taken the world by storm. . . . → Read More: The brave new world of emoji: Why and how has emoji taken the world by storm?

5 New Linguistics Textbooks from Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press Textbooks

Blog post by James McKellar, Retail Marketing Executive for Linguistics at Cambridge University Press.

I wanted to share a post with our linguistics followers about a few exciting new textbooks we have recently published here at Cambridge. For lecturers looking for inspection copies please follow the links through to the relevant books pages to order. Enjoy!

 5) Introducing Morphology 2nd edition by Rochelle Lieber

 Morphology is the study of how words are put together. A lively introduction to the subject, this textbook is intended for undergraduates with relatively little background in linguistics. Providing data from a wide variety of languages, it includes hands-on activities such as ‘challenge’ boxes, designed to encourage students to gather their own data and analyze it, work with data on websites, . . . → Read More: 5 New Linguistics Textbooks from Cambridge University Press

Getting the Right Balance: Pragmatics in Speech and Language Therapy

Pragmatic and Discourse Disorders

Blog post written by Louise Cummings author of Pragmatic and Discourse Disorders.

The clinical education of speech and language therapy (SLT) students in the UK is a tightly regulated process. No less than three bodies have SLT education within their purview. These bodies are the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (RCSLT), the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) and the Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC). Each of these bodies has a particular role to play in SLT education. The RCSLT provides curriculum guidelines and sets good practice guidelines for the education and training of SLTs and for their continuing professional development. The QAA provides subject benchmarks for SLT. These benchmarks stipulate baseline outcomes which a graduate in SLT . . . → Read More: Getting the Right Balance: Pragmatics in Speech and Language Therapy

The truth about transitions: What psycholinguistics can teach us about writing

The Reader's Brain

Blog post written by Yellowlees Douglas author of The Reader’s Brain: How Neuroscience Can Make You A Better Writer

Journalists, particularly those writing for American audiences, practically have transitions drilled into their heads from their first forays into writing for the public. Where’s your transition? their editors persist, as they linger over each sentence. However, those editors and newsroom sages handed on advice with well-established roots in psycholinguistics—and with particularly striking benefits for the reading public. I explore what linguistics, psychology, and neuroscience can teach us about writing in my forthcoming The Reader’s Brain: How Neuroscience Can Make You a Better Writer. And using an abundance of transitions is perhaps the simplest advice you can follow to make your writing easy to . . . → Read More: The truth about transitions: What psycholinguistics can teach us about writing

Explore the latest titles on the Virtual Linguistics Bookcase…

Virtual Linguistics Bookcase

Cambridge University Press presents the Virtual Linguistics Bookcase tour. Click the bookcase below to take a virtual tour of some of our newest titles. When you find a product that you want to find out more about simply click the link provided to be taken to the Cambridge University website for more information and . . . → Read More: Explore the latest titles on the Virtual Linguistics Bookcase…

Metaphor: What does figurative mean?

Figurative Language, written by Barbara Dancygier and Eve Sweetser, is a lively, comprehensive and practical book which offers a new, integrated and linguistically sound understanding of what figurative language is. The following extract is taken from the Introduction.

Thinking about figurative language requires first of all that we identify some such entity – that we distinguish figurative language from non-figurative or literal language. And this is a more complex task than one might think. To begin with, there appears to be a circular reasoning loop involved in many speakers’ assessments: on the one hand they feel that figurative language is special or artistic, and on the other hand they feel that the fact of something’s being an everyday usage is in itself evidence that . . . → Read More: Metaphor: What does figurative mean?