Applied Psycholinguistics Call For Editor Proposals

Professor Martha Crago is completing her tenure in December 2018 from her position as Editor of Applied Psycholinguistics (AP). Cambridge University Press is now inviting applications for the position of Editor. A team of Co-Editors will also be considered. Final appointment decisions will be made by the Syndicate of Cambridge University Press.

The deadline for applications is January 15, 2018.

AP is a refereed journal of international scope publishing original research papers on the psychological and linguistic processes involved in language. Each volume contains six issues with articles examining language processing, language development, language use and language disorders in adults and children with a particular emphasis on cross-language and second language/bilingual studies. The journal gathers together the best work from a variety of . . . → Read More: Applied Psycholinguistics Call For Editor Proposals

Applied Psycholinguistics Readership Survey

APS Survey

Applied Psycholinguistics publishes original research papers on the psychological processes involved in language. It examines language development, language use and language disorders in adults and children with a particular emphasis on cross-language studies. The journal gathers together the best work from a variety of disciplines including linguistics, psychology, reading, education, language learning, speech and hearing, and neurology.

The journal is currently conducting a readership survey and the editor invites you to share your thoughts. The survey is completely anonymous. However, we are offering a prize draw as thanks for your input. Participants who complete the survey and submit contact information will be entered into a prize draw to win one of two Amazon.com gift cards for $125 / £100.

The readership survey will take . . . → Read More: Applied Psycholinguistics Readership Survey

The child’s journey into language: Some frequently asked questions…

First Language Acquisition Eve Clark

Eve V. Clark’s research has involved both observational and experimental studies aimed at discovering what language children understand and what they produce at different stages in development. . . . → Read More: The child’s journey into language: Some frequently asked questions…

Why We Gesture: The surprising role of hand movements in communication

Why We Gestyre

Blog post by David McNeill author of Why We Gesture: The Surprising role of the hands in communication

Why do we gesture? Many would say it brings emphasis, energy and ornamentation to speech (which is assumed to be the core of what is taking place); in short, gesture is an “add-on.” (as Adam Kendon, who also rejects the idea, phrases it). However,the evidence is against this. The lay view of gesture is that one “talks with one’s hands.” You can’t find a word so you resort to gesture. Marianne Gullberg debunks this ancient idea. As she succinctly puts it, rather than gesture starting when words stop,gesture stops as well.  So if, contrary to lay belief, we don’t “talk with our hands”, why . . . → Read More: Why We Gesture: The surprising role of hand movements in communication

Bilingual Language Acquisition

How do children develop bilingual competence? Do bilingual children develop language in the same way as monolinguals? Set in the context of findings on language development, Bilingual Language Acquisition examines the acquisition of English and Spanish by two brothers in the first six years of their lives. (The following excerpt is taken from Chapter 1).

Introduction

Bingual language acquisition

The terms bilingual and bilingualism have received diverse definitions. In this book, bilingual (the person), and bilingualism (the condition or state of affairs) refer to the use of two (or more) languages in everyday life. Two major patterns of language acquisition have been identified in studies of early bilingualism: simultaneous bilingualism and sequential bilingualism, but no agreement exists with respect to the age at . . . → Read More: Bilingual Language Acquisition

Sapir, Whorf, and the hypothesis that wasn’t

written by Aneta Pavlenko, Temple University

 

One of the linchpins of human information-processing are the frames of expectation we apply to the constant flow of information. These frames allow us to impose meaning on the things we see, hear, or read and to position ourselves with regard to ideas and arguments. In the case of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis (SWH), these frames require us to adopt one of the three recognizable positions: for (which may brand us as radicals), against (a marker of a skeptic or a rational thinker), or in-between (a sign of a temperate scholar willing to consider the pros and cons of everything). The adoption of conventional frames of expectation saves us a lot of valuable time . . . → Read More: Sapir, Whorf, and the hypothesis that wasn’t