Fifty Years of JIPA

This year JIPA celebrates 50 years under its present title, and 20 years of publication with CUP. But that’s only part of a 134-year story. Under earlier titles (The Phonetic Teacher and Le Maître Phonétique) the journal dates back to 1886, and was printed entirely in IPA phonetic symbols for over 80 years. It switched to ordinary orthography in 1971 and at the same time adopted the title Journal of the International Phonetic Association, with the catchy acronym JIPA.

After a hundred years of conventional typesetting and printing, the journal went through an innovative era of desktop publishing in the 1980s and 90s. The partnership with CUP began with Volume 31 in 2001, and the journal acquired its striking black and orange cover. . . . → Read More: Fifty Years of JIPA

Uptalk: The Phenomenon of Rising Intonation: an interview with author Paul Warren

Paul Warren author of Uptalk

Cambridge author Paul Warren, Victoria University of Wellington answers out questions on Uptalk: The Phenomenon of Rising Intonation . . . → Read More: Uptalk: The Phenomenon of Rising Intonation: an interview with author Paul Warren

A career in phonetics, applied linguistics and the public service: Talking with John Trim (part 1)

Post written by David Little and Lid King, based on an article in Language Teaching 

John Trim was born in 1924 and died in January 2013. His father was a docker and his mother the daughter of a printer; both were active in the local Workers’ Educational Association. John described the atmosphere of his home as ‘intellectual, internationalist and socialist’. He won a scholarship from his primary school to Leyton High School, where he learned French and German. For the first term – which John missed because he had pneumonia – his French teacher taught the language entirely in phonetic transcription in order to lay the foundations of accurate pronunciation. In his second year John had to choose between Latin and German. . . . → Read More: A career in phonetics, applied linguistics and the public service: Talking with John Trim (part 1)